eMarketer: Search Component, Speed of Engagement Propel YouTube Video Ads

Video is an increasingly crowded space, one that marketers are grappling with when rolling out video advertising on YouTube. Greg Manago, managing director for North America and senior producer for entertainment at global media agency network Mindshare, spoke to eMarketer’s Danielle Drolet about breaking through the clutter.

 

eMarketer: How do you and your clients define YouTube as a video advertising platform?

Greg Manago: It depends on the client, their need, and what the ad is. If a client wants to engage consumers or viewers and get them to upload video or participate in a campaign, then they use it more like social media. If they want to reach the broadest audience, that’s when they would buy across the larger networks like Vice and some of those other popular multichannel networks.

Then, of course, some brands simply use it as a publishing channel where they want to release content. And also, to try to drive consumers with other social media and paid placements to watch some longer-form content.

“YouTube is like a search engine. A place like Facebook at the end of the day is a walled garden. Same with Twitter.”

eMarketer: What are the key benefits of advertising on YouTube?

Manago: YouTube is like a search engine. A place like Facebook at the end of the day is a walled garden. Same with Twitter. But, since YouTube behaves a lot like a search engine, and is in fact connected to, in a lot of ways, Google, it’s one of the first stops that people make when they’re searching for video on the internet. That’s the advantage, and why you have to be there.

eMarketer: What are the challenges for activating a video ad on YouTube?

Manago: The challenge now is that there is so much video out there in general. Brands that are creating and putting out video, and then managing their own channels—be it YouTube or another channel—are having a hard time figuring out how to break through.

eMarketer: Do you find that there are particular industries that seem well-suited for YouTube video ads?

Manago: No. There’s a way to buy YouTube for any brand depending on what it is that you want to do. There is an audience out there for everybody. It doesn’t make more sense for one brand than another. What it comes down to is what the campaign is looking to do.

eMarketer: What type of content works best for advertisers to associate with on YouTube?

Manago: It’s hard to say genre-wise which content works best for brands. Depending on the brand, a how-to video might be more important for a hair-focused brand than to an auto company.

“Be able to either communicate your message or captivate the audience in that first five seconds. Create something engaging.”

We navigate the space through the idea of engagement, and figuring out a way to engage viewers either for the long haul or in that first five seconds, particularly with autoplay ads where it can be skipped after five seconds. Be able to either communicate your message or captivate the audience in that first five seconds. Creating something engaging.

eMarketer: Is YouTube’s popularity as a destination, or with its videos embedded throughout the internet, enough reason to place video ads there?

Manago: Yes. It’s two things. It’s a place where a lot of viewers go to view content—shorter-form, personal content that you upload of your own family, classic television content that may or may not even be allowed to be there, sports, etc. But also, it’s a place for all the way up through to the program channels that YouTube and other brands own. Some of our clients see it as a great place to publish as well.

Marketers look at it as a platform where they can capture the audience and then look and communicate to that audience. It’s also a place to engage an audience with their own channel. It’s interesting in that brands are publishers and buyers on the same network. Not that unusual in the digital age, but five years ago that would be unheard of.

eMarketer: Do you think that YouTube video advertising is more effective for customer acquisition than most other digital video ads, which typically are used mainly for brand awareness?

Manago: That’s a hard question to answer. Generally, video content mass communication is used for awareness. For customer acquisition, it depends on what it is that’s happening in the video, the creative element and what the brand is, etc. I’m not necessarily sure that YouTube vs. other video networks or places to post video make more sense. Recommendations play a big part in customer acquisition in a lot of places, which probably happens more in social.

“Generally, video content mass communication is used for awareness. For customer acquisition, it depends on what it is that’s happening in the video.”

eMarketer: What are some best practices for marketers who are placing or want to place video ads on YouTube?

Manago: Be somewhat selective—there is a lot out there and a lot that might not be the best content created. Be careful what you’re associating your brand with.

Again, engagement is huge—getting consumers to engage in that first five seconds.

Contextual relevancy. There is something to be said about creating an asset that’s a bit different in digital than a TV asset. Contextual relevancy is important and proven to work.

Do something that makes the videos interactive. Make the experience a completely different one than simply watching an ad on TV, which is passive. Again, not every campaign needs that. Not every brand wants to do that. We like to recommend it if the creative calls for it because it’s a way to break through.

Read the interview on eMarketer (Pay Wall) : http://totalaccess.emarketer.com/view/Interview/Search-Component-Speed-of-Engagement-Propel-YouTube-Video-Ads/6001520?ECID=TA1002

Posted on October 30, 2014 .